brochure design

Brochures

Brochure design that stands can include several techniques:

1) Folder with inserts. A useful thing about this approach is that we can customize a brochure according to an individual client, only sending them the elements that are relevant to them.

As well as giving the customer exactly what they need, the loose inserts will ensure cost savings on brochure printing and be more environmentally friendly.

It’s also easy to extend marketing with this format, since you can send your clients updated or new inserts to add to the pocket folder brochure. This not only encourages your customers to keep the folder, but also ensures that they look back at it from time to time and allows you to maintain contact with them.

2) Folding paper is a cost-effective and memorable way to connect with your readers, and a surprising amount of information can be contained within a relatively small space. This works well for maps, invitations, posters and larger infographics.

3) Tabs are simple to add to a brochure and can have an immediate effect in terms of usability and navigation. And combining tabs with a strong, confident use of typography and striking color means that it will look good too.

4) Die cuts lend visual interest to a brochure, and when used in conjunction with a well thought layout design, can be effective and even add to the message of the brochure itself.

5) Unusual shapes. Sometimes there are reasons why brochures are square or rectangular, from layout issues and printing techniques to packaging and even psychological considerations. Once in a while it’s nice to break out of the box, square and rectangle.

6) Binding. Choosing an unusual binding method for a brochure creates a strong first impression. Since the majority of brochures are saddle-stitched (or perfect bound), almost any other binding technique can catch a readers’ attention. From threading or sewing, through to using an unusual clip or pin, it doesn’t have to be pricey or complicated to be effective.

7) Keeping it readable and real. Generate Design makes sure that the choices we make about the physical look and feel of your brochure tie in with the company’s branding, style and the message you want to give. So when designing for a top-end luxury restaurant, it’s unlikely that a graffiti-style die-cut front cover is going to fit the bill, no matter how trendy it looks. As with all good design, it’s important to keep our eye on the big picture. The purpose of a brochure is to inform the reader, so if the design is so wacky that your reader misses the crucial information, it hasn’t worked.

One final consideration is the important fact that brochures need to be read, so we make sure that your brochure is large enough to be legible and not complicated so it’s difficult to open, close or navigate. As the designers, we do the hard work so that the reader doesn’t have to.